The Next Stage in Boardroom Gender Diversity

November has been a busy month for the issue of boardroom diversity. Earlier, this month, the Parker Review on ethnic diversity in the boardroom was published (discussed here), and now the Hampton-Alexander Review have published its first report on FTSE Women Leaders.

The Hampton-Alexander Review succeeds the review led by Lord Davies that took place between 2011 and 2015. There can be no doubt that notable progress was made in that period. In 2011, women accounted for 12.5% of FTSE 100 directors, but this had risen to 26.1% by the end of 2015. In 2010, there were 21 FTSE 100 companies with no female directors at all, whereas today, there are no all-male boards in the FTSE 100. However, it is also acknowledged that the Davies Review was not an unqualified success:

  • The gains made in the FTSE 250 were less modest than in the FTSE 100. By the end of 2015, women accounted for 19.6% of FTSE 250 directors, and there was 15 companies in the FTSE 250 that did not have any female directors.
  • The most notable failure of the Davies Review was the poor increase in the number of female executive directors. In 2011, there were only 18 female directors in the FTSE 100 (accounting for 5.5% of the total number of directors). By 2015, this had only risen to 26 (9.6% of the total).

The Hampton-Alexander Review aims to combat these issues in two ways. First, whereas the Davies Review largely focused on FTSE 100 companies, the Hampton-Alexander Review focuses on FTSE 350 companies. The principal goal set by the Hampton-Alexander Review is that FTSE 350 companies should aim for a minimum of 33% female representation by the end of 2020. The Hampton-Alexander Review notes that, as of November 2016, the figure is stands at 23%.

Second, the Hampton-Alexander Review focuses much more strongly on the ‘executive pipeline challenge’ and all CEOs of FTSE 350 companies should take action to improve the under-representation of women on the Executive Committee and in the layer immediately below. Unfortunately, the Review then goes on to recommend that FTSE 100 companies should aim for a minimum of 33% women’s representation across their Executive Committee by 2020. It is disappointing that no goal has been set for FTSE 250 companies, but the Review does note that it did not obtain enough data to set a goal for FTSE 250 companies, and it hopes to acquire more data in 2017.

The Davies Review established a firm foundation, but much more work needs to be done. It is hoped that the recommendations of the Hampton-Alexander Review will improve female representation in those ares where progress was weak, In particular, if the benefits of boardroom diversity are to be realised, it is important that women are placed in positions of leadership, and not confined to relatively powerless non-executive director positions. FTSE 350 companies will undoubtedly commit to the Hampton-Alexander Review, but it is hoped that they commit to the spirit of the Review, and not just the letter.

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