The Corporate Governance Review

Today, the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy launched a corporate governance review, accompanied by a Green Paper on corporate governance reform. The need for a review was set out by the Prime Minister in the Green Paper’s introduction:

‘for people to retain faith in capitalism and free markets, big business must earn and keep the trust and confidence of their customers, employees and the wider public. Where this social contract breaks down and individual businesses decide to play by their own rules, faith in the business community as a whole diminishes – to the detriment of all. It is clear that in recent years, the behaviour of a limited few has damaged the reputation of the many. It is clear that something has to change.’

Although the title of the Green Paper (‘Corporate Governance Reform’) indicates a broad, wide-ranging discussion, the Paper does not provide a review of corporate governance in general, and instead focuses on three specific issues, with a very brief ‘other issues’ category at the end of the Paper. The Paper does stress that the Paper is designed to ‘stimulate a debate on a range of options for strengthening the UK’s corporate governance framework’ and that ‘[t]he Government does not have preferred options at this stage.’ Accordingly, this Paper is merely the first step on what may prove to be a lengthy reform process (especially as large parts of the government and civil service will be preoccupied with Brexit). These areas and the suggested potential reforms will be set out.

Executive pay

The first governance issue discussed is one of the more controversial, namely executive remuneration. The Paper notes that ‘there is a widespread perception that executive pay has become increasingly disconnected from both the pay of ordinary working people and the underlying long-term performance of companies.’ The Paper discusses five areas where the regulation of executive remuneration in quoted companies could be reformed:

  1. Shareholder voting and other rights: The Paper puts forward a number of possible options for reform, namely (i) increasing the scope of the binding vote; (ii) introduce stronger consequences for a company losing the advisory vote; (iii) requiring or encouraging quoted companies to set an upper threshold for annual pay and requiring a binding vote if pay exceeds that threshold; (iv) requiring the binding vote to be held more frequently than the current three-year period, and; (v) strengthening the UK Corporate Governance Code to provide greater specificity on how companies should engage with shareholders on pay.
  2. Shareholder engagement on pay: The Paper discusses several reforms aimed at improving shareholder engagement on pay issues, namely (i) mandatory disclosure of fund managers’ voting records at AGMs and the extent to which they made use of proxy voting; (ii) establishing a senior shareholder committee to engage with executive remuneration arrangements, and; (iii) considering ways to facilitate or encourage individual retail shareholders to exercise their rights to vote on pay and other corporate decisions.
  3. The remuneration committee: The Paper notes the existence of concerns that ‘remuneration committees are not sufficiently or visibly pro-active in consulting formally with shareholders and with the company’s workforce. There are concerns too, that some lack the authority or inclination to take positions that may not align with the CEO or wider executive team’s expectations.’ Accordingly, the Paper suggests potential reforms, namely (i) requiring the remuneration committee to consult shareholders and the wider company workforce in advance of preparing its pay policy, and; (ii) requiring the chairs of remuneration committees to have served for at least 12 months on the remuneration committee before taking up the role.
  4. Transparency: The Paper states that ‘[t]he Government wants to explore whether there is additional information which companies could provide which would make shareholders more effective in holding boards to account on their executive pay arrangements.’ The suggested potential reforms are (i) requiring companies to publish ratios comparing CEO pay to that of the wider workforce, and; (ii) whether existing requirements regarding the disclosure of performance targets that trigger bonuses need to be strengthened.
  5. Long-term executive pay incentives: The Paper looks at possible reforms either replacing or amending practice regarding long-term incentive plans.

Strengthening stakeholder voice

The second major issue the Paper focuses on is strengthening the employee, customer, and wider stakeholder voice. The Paper notes that ‘[m]any companies and their boards recognise clearly the wider societal responsibilities they have and the enormous benefit they gain through wider engagement around their business activities.’ However, it then goes on to state that ‘some have said that companies need to do more to reassure the public that they are being run, not just with an eye to the interests of the board and the shareholders, but with a recognition of their responsibilities to employees, customers, suppliers and wider society.’ To that end, suggested potential reforms include (i) creating stakeholder advisory panels; (ii) designating existing non-executive directors to ensure that the voices of key interested groups, especially that of employees, is being heard at board level; (iii) appointing individual stakeholder representatives to company boards, and; (iv) strengthening the reporting requirements relating to stakeholder engagement.

Corporate governance in private companies

The recent BHS scandal has focused attention on corporate governance and private companies (see blog post here on this). The Paper notes that private companies ‘are not expected or required to meet the same formal corporate governance and reporting standards as publicly listed companies, yet the consequences when things go wrong can be equally severe for other stakeholders.’ Accordingly, several suggested reforms include (i) extending the UK Corporate Governance Code to private companies, or developing a new Code aimed at such companies, and; (ii) extending the scope of certain reporting requirements to cover certain private companies.

Other issues

The final major section of the Paper is entitled ‘other issues’, but it only really focuses on one issue, namely whether the UK’s comply or explain system remains effective in providing the right combination of high standards and low burdens.

Conclusion

The Green Paper is a welcome development and it contains a raft of reforms that deserve wider discussion. However, it does only focus on a few specific areas of corporate governance (admittedly those that have drawn most ire in recent years). Governments and businesses will regularly talk of the importance of having strong governance standards, but reforms in this areas have tended to be rather tepid. It will be interesting to see how committed the government is to governance reform, especially if Brexit does cause the UK to become a more unattractive place to do business.

2 thoughts on “The Corporate Governance Review

  1. Pingback: Developments in Corporate Governacne and Stewardship | Company Law and Corporate Governance

  2. Pingback: Reviewing the UK Corporate Governance Code | Company Law and Corporate Governance

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